Moscow homes near water in short supply, start at RUB 19m

Moscow homes near water in short supply, start at RUB 19m

Published at: 2016-04-26 12:50 | Author: CIJ Russia
The most expensive house on sale in the Moscow area near a large body is on the market for RUB 980 million. The Stroygazeta newspaper cites Penny Lane Realty as claiming the property is located near Ostashkov highway.
However, market observers claim there are few such water properties currently available. A chain of reservoirs along the Dmitrov highway is popular among boaters thanks to its connection with the Moscow river, however, it's been over a decade since projects were undertaken (including infrastructure for yachts) in the area. The primary "big water" projects are mainly located near the Dmitrov, Ostashkovskoe and Yaroslavl highways and it's estimated that around 139 properties are for sale, with an average bid price of RUB 84m. The cheapest are to be found along the Yaroslavl highway for RUB 19m, while the Dmitrov highway offers a minimum entry price of RUB 21.2m. Ostashkovskoe highway locations are more expensive, beginning at RUB 52m.

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